CEPF
Protecting Nature's Hotspots for people and prosperity

Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany

Tab 1

Overview
​​Maputo coast: flowering succulents, coastal brush, and ocean

CEPF is no longer active in this region.​

The Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot unites three, enchanting and diverse centers of endemism (Maputaland, Pondoland and Albany) culminating six of South Africa's eight biomes in an area of nearly 275,000 km² along the east coast of southern Africa, below the Great Escarpment.

The hotspot is the second richest flori​​stic region in southern Africa (after the Cape Floristic Region) and also the second richest floristic region in Africa for its size. At a habitat level, one type of forest where at least 598 tree species occur, three types of endemic subtropical thicket, six types of bushveld and five types of grasslands are unique to the hotspot. The coastal waters of this hotspot, which encompass three of South Africa’s six marine bioregions, are also significant at the global level for their diversity of marine species.

The loss and degradation of habitat as well as degradation of marine and estuarine resources continue to occur due to major threats, which include commercial and subsistence farming, timber production, urban development and the increasing threat of mining impacting the region. The unsustainable use of natural resources, the spread of invasive alien species and human-wildlife conflict are also placing pressure on the hotspot’s biodiversity and ecosystems.

CEPF’s niche in the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot will be to support civil society in applying innovative approaches to conservation in undercapacitated protected areas, key biodiversity areas and priority corridors, thereby enabling changes in policy and building resilience in the region’s ecosystems and economy to sustain biodiversity in the long term.
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Tab 2

Strategy
Local inhabitants of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany hotspot dancing

The Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot is one of the most biologically important regions on the planet, but it is under serious threat from various forms of encroachment such as investments in infrastructure development and tourism, unsustainable land and water use, and habitat loss and degradation from agriculture.

Historically, investment in this region has flowed to state conservation agencies and governments for protected area management, which is also geared toward poverty alleviation and economic growth.

The private sector is realizing more and more that its financial success and viability are highly dependent on the surrounding natural resources and ecosystem services. Civil society is well placed to offer innovation and new approaches to address both immediate threats to biodiversity and their underlying causes. Civil society can strategically address top priorities, complement existing programs and leverage donor and government funds for innovative activities.

Guided by an ecosystem profile developed with stakeholders, our investment will focus on supporting civil society in applying innovative approaches to conservation in undercapacitated protected areas, key biodiversity areas and priority corridors, thereby enabling changes in policy and building resilience in the region’s ecosystems and economy to sustain biodiversity in the long term.

We expect to launch the award of grants later this year, beginning with the appointment of a regional implementation team.

Five strategic directions will guide our approach:

1. Strengthen protection and management in undercapacitated and emerging protected
    areas in three priority key biodiversity areas
2. Expand conservation areas and improve land use in 19 key biodiversity areas through
     innovative approaches
3. Maintain and restore ecosystem function and integrity in the Highland Grasslands and
     Pondoland corridors
4. Create an enabling environment to improve conservation and management of
     Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany priority sites
5. Provide strategic leadership and effective coordination of CEPF investment through a 
    regional implementation team

Tab 3

Priorities
CEPF Strategic Directions CEPF Investment Priorities
1. Strengthen protection and management in undercapacitated and emerging protected areas in 3 priority key biodiversity areas 1.1 Support public-private partnerships and civil society initiatives to enable effective management of marine protected areas in the Ponto d’Ouro Partial Marine Reserve in Mozambique and adjacent to the Mkambati and Dwesa-Cwebe reserves in the Pondoland North Coast Key Biodiversity Area in South Africa
1.2 Promote innovative approaches to strengthen protection and management in the Licuati Forests and Eastern Swazi Lebombo Key Biodiversity Area in Mozambique and Swaziland
2. Expand conservation areas and improve land use in 19 key biodiversity areas through innovative approaches 2.1 Develop and implement innovative approaches to expand private and communal protected areas, particularly for habitats underrepresented in the current protected area network
2.2 Integrate conservation practice into land-reform agreements to expand conservation management and sustain livelihood opportunities
3. Maintain and restore ecosystem function and integrity in the Highland Grasslands and Pondoland corridors 3.1 Develop and implement innovative projects that expand conservation management and benefit people in threatened catchment, freshwater and estuarine ecosystems
3.2 Improve implementation of environmental regulations to maintain functional ecosystem corridors, particularly rivers and coastal zones
3.3 Support community stewardship initiatives that will catalyze sustainable financing from local carbon markets.
3.4 Improve effectiveness of government-sponsored large-scale natural resource management programs in the corridors by improving knowledge and support for implementation
4. Create an enabling environment to improve conservation and management of Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany priority sites 4.1 Expand and strengthen civil society by supporting training and further educational opportunities for the staff of civil society organizations in Mozambique and Swaziland
4.2 Establish and strengthen institutional arrangements that will increase and coordinate civil society participation and facilitate lessons sharing to promote linkages that ensure effective conservation action at a broad scale
5. Provide strategic leadership and effective coordination of CEPF investment through a regional implementation team 5.1 Build a broad constituency of civil society groups working across institutional and political boundaries towards achieving the shared conservation goals described in the ecosystem profile

Tab 4

Maps

Map of Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot


Priority Corridors and Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment


Tab 5

Documents

Core Documents

  • Ecosystem Profile Summary
    English (PDF - 2.6 MB)

  • Sumário do Perfil do Ecossistema
    Português (PDF - 3 MB)

  • Ecosystem Profile, April 2010
    English (PDF - 2.8 MB)

  • GEF Focal Point Endorsements
    Swaziland, English (PDF - 454 KB)
    South Africa, English (PDF - 431 KB)
    Mozambique, English (PDF - 69 KB)

 

Monitoring & Evaluation

  • Annual Portfolio Overview, August 2014
    English (PDF - 695 KB)​

  • Mid-term Assessment of CEPF Investment
    English​ (PDF - 427 KB)

  • Annual Portfolio Overview, October 2012
    English (PDF - 320 KB)

  • Project Final Reports
    Reports compiled by project leaders detailing final results and lessons learned
    View reports

  • Annual Portfolio Overview, October 2011
    English (PDF - 344 KB)


Newsletters

MPAH Newsletter IBA Newsletter
  • Number 3, Winter 2013
    English (PDF - 1 MB)
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Other Publications

  • South Africa's Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas Status Report 2015, BirdLife International South Africa, 2015
    English​ (PDF - 2.6 MB)

  • Biodiversity Stewardship: Partnerships for Securing Biodiversity, South African National Biodiversity Institute, 2014
    English​ (PDF - 2.2 MB) 

  • Important Bird Areas of Kwazulu-Natal, BirdLife South Africa
    English (PDF - 752 KB)​

  • Lubombo Eco Trails Brochure, Lubombo Conservancy
    English​ (PDF - 2.8 MB)
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Tab 6

Case Studies

​Biodiv​ersity Stewardship


Factsheet (PDF - 920 KB)

Umgano Project (PDF - 911 KB)


WWF-SA Water Balance (PDF - 1.2 MB)
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Local government and civil society


Climate change response in Alfred Nzo District Municipality
- English (PDF - 944 KB)
Portuguese (PDF - 896 KB)

Urban conservation in Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality
- English (PDF - 1.3 MB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 1.3 MB)

uMngeni Ecological Infrastructure Partnership
- English (PDF - 1 MB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 1 MB)


Greater uMngeni Biosphere Reserve
- English (PDF - 964 KB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 953 KB)

Partnering for biodiversity management and service delivery
- English (PDF - 666 KB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 597 KB)
 

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Community Conservation


Restoring Afromontane forests and grasslands: Amathole region
- English (PDF - 1.2 MB)
Portuguese (PDF - 1.2 MB)​

Community-based natural resource management: Futi Corridor, Mozambique
- English (PDF - 1.1 MB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 1.2 MB)

Eco-business planning: Lubombo region, Swaziland
- English (PDF - 1.1 MB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 1.1 MB)


Restoration of indigenous forests: Ntsubane forest complex
- English (PDF - 1.3 MB)
Portuguese​ (PDF - 1.2 MB)

Strengthening community conservation across landscapes
- English (PDF - 768 KB)
Portuguese​​ (PDF - 600 KB)
 
Fast Facts

​Status: CLOSED

Initial investment:
$6.65 million
2010-2015
Recent Newsletters
​MPAH Newsletter IBA Newsletter
Regional Resources
​​​​Ecosystem Profile, April 2010

Ecosystem Profile Summary
English (PDF - 3 MB)
Portuguese (PDF - 3 MB)

Featured Stories​

Regional Documents

Project Final Reports: Project leaders detail results and lessons learned

Project Database

RIT Website: Wildlands Conservation Trust​

Photo gallery: Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot​