CEPF
Protecting Nature's Hotspots for people and prosperity

Mediterranean Basin

Tab 1

Overview

Northern Bald Ibis
The Critically Endangered northern bald ibis was once found in the Middle East, Africa and Europe. © O. Langrand

CEPF is active in this region.

The Mediterranean Basin Biodiversity Hotspot is the second largest hotspot in the world and the largest of the world’s five Mediterranean-climate regions. The hotspot covers more than 2 million square kilometers and stretches west to east from Portugal to Jordan and north to south from northern Italy to Cape Verde.

It is the third richest hotspot in the world in terms of its plant diversity (Mittermeier et al. 2004). Approximately 30,000 plant species occur, and more than 13,000 species are found nowhere else, or endemic, to the hot​​spot; yet, many more are being discovered every year (Plantlife International 2010, unpublished report).

Rivaling the natural diversity in the hotspot, the cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic diversity of the region is spectacular. The region contains some of the world’s first and greatest civilizations, the world’s oldest sovereign state and its first constitutional republic with San Marino dating back to 301 A.D.

Many of the ecosystems reached an equilibrium long ago with human activity dominating the landscapes. However, this delicate balance is in a precarious state as many local communities depend on remaining habitats for fresh water, food and a variety of other ecosystem services. CEPF investment in the Mediterranean Basin Hotspot is essential to stem the threats, balance economic development with the needs of natural areas, and conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services in this vast region.


VIDEO: Interview with Mohammed Yousef, Mediterranean Basin Hotspot Regional Implementation Team Leader, BirdLife International
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Tab 2

Strategy

Iris sofarana keserwana, endemic to Lebanon
Iris sofarana keserwana, endemic to Lebanon. © Magda Bou Dagher

Access to funding for local nonprofit organizations working on biodiversity conservation in the Mediterranean Basin Hotspot is limited, with most support provided by a small group of dedicated donors, including CEPF. During our initial investment, we awarded 108 grants to 84 different organizations in 12 countries.

This first investment phase demonstrated that civil society organizations do exist in each hotspot country, and that adequate financial support, combined with technical support, has the potential to build strong constituencies able to tackle conservation issues at the local level.

CEPF's second phase of investment will focus on protecting plants, promoting regional networking and preserving three ecosystems—coastal, freshwater and traditionally managed landscapes.

Site-based conservation action is a priority for our strategy, as are building the capacity of grantees and developing projects with sustainable impacts.​

Tab 3

Priorities
CEPF's investment in the Mediterranean Basin Biodiversity Hotspot is guided by the following strategic directions as outlined in the ecosystem profile.

1. Support civil society to engage stakeholders in demonstrating integrated approaches for the preservation of biodiversity in coastal areas.

     1.1 Engage local stakeholders in conservation actions that address threats to key elements of biodiversity in priority               Key Biodiversity Areas in the coastal zone.

     1. 2 Engage private sector stakeholders to adopt sustainable practices that deliver positive impacts for conservation              in priority Key Biodiversity Areas in the coastal zone.

     1.3 Support civil society to engage with local or national governments to mainstream biodiversity conservation into                 integrated coastal zone management, land-use and development planning processes.

2. Support the sustainable management of water catchments through integrated approaches for the                conservation of threatened freshwater biodiversity.

     2.1 Enhance the knowledge base on freshwater biodiversity and the importance of freshwater ecosystem services.

     2.2 Take action to reduce threats and improve management of selected sites in priority freshwater catchments with               the participation of local stakeholders.

     2.3 Engage with government, private sector and other stakeholders to support integrated river basin management                 practices that reduce threats to biodiversity in priority catchment management zones.

3. Promote the maintenance of traditional land use practices necessary for the conservation of Mediterranean biodiversity in priority corridors of high cultural and biodiversity value.

     3.1 Support local communities to increase the benefit they receive from maintaining and enhancing traditional,                       biodiversity-friendly land-use and agricultural practices.

     3.2 Promote awareness of the value of traditional, biodiversity-friendly& land-use practices among local community               and government decision makers, to secure their recognition and support.

     3.3 Encourage business actors in the trade chain to support and promote traditional, biodiversity-friendly land-use                 practices.

4. Strengthen the engagement of civil society to support the conservation of plants that are critically endangered or have highly restricted ranges.

     4.1 Increase knowledge and skills to support assessment and planning for the conservation of plants, and foster the             emergence of a new generation of young professionals in plant conservation.

     4.2 Support integration of plant conservation into the management of protected areas.

     4.3 Support innovative actions for the conservation of important populations of plants, working with land owners and             managers.

5. Strengthen the regional conservation community through the sharing of best practices and knowledge among grantees across the hotspot.​

     5.1 Support regional and thematically focused learning processes for civil society organizations and stakeholders.

     5.2 Support grantees to understand and engage with international conventions and processes.

6. Provide strategic leadership and effective coordination of CEPF investment through a regional implelemntation team. 

     6.1 Build a constituency of civil society groups working across institutional and political boundaries toward achieving             the shared conservation goals described in the ecosystem profile.

     6.2 Act as a liaison unit for relevant networks throughout the Mediterranean to harmonize investments and direct                  new funding to priority issues and sites. 

Tab 4

Maps
Map of the Mediterranean Basin Hotspot

Map of the Mediterranean Basin Hotspot


Map of Key Biodiversity Areas in the Mediterranean Basin Hotspot


Key Biodiversity Areas in the Mediterranean Basin Hotspot


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Southwest Balkans

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Southwest Balkans 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Eastern Adriatic

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Eastern Adriatic 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – The Taurus Mountains

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – The Taurus Mountains 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Orontes Valley and Lebanon Mountains

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Orontes Valley and Lebanon Mountains 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Cyrenaican Peninsula

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Cyrenaican Peninsula 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – The Atlas Mountains

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – The Atlas Mountains 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Mountains, Plateaus and Wetlands of Algerian Tell and Tunisia

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Mountains, Plateaus and Wetlands of Algerian Tell and Tunisia 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Marmara Sea Basin

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Marmara Sea Basin 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Northern Mesopotamia

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Northern Mesopotamia 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – South Syria and Northern Jordan

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – South Syria and Northern Jordan 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Nile Delta Coast

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Nile Delta Coast 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Wetlands of Tunisia and Libya

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Wetlands of Tunisia and Libya 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Oranie and Molouya

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Oranie and Molouya 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Coastal Atlantic Plains

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Coastal Atlantic Plains 


Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Cape Verde

Priority Key Biodiversity Areas for CEPF Investment – Cape Verde

Tab 5

Documents


Reinvestment​


CORE DOCUMENTS​

  • ​Ecosystem Profile, July 2017
    English (PDF - 31 MB)

  • Ecosystem Profile Summary, July 2017
    English​ (PDF - 4.7 MB) / French (PDF - 5 MB) / Arabic (PDF - 2.7 MB) 

     ​

Initial Investment


CORE DOCUMENTS
  • Ecosystem Profile, July 2010
    English (PDF - 5.5 MB) / French​ (PDF - 6 MB)

  • Summary Brochure
    English (PDF - 703 KB)  /  French (PDF - 3 MB) / Arabic (PDF - 1.3 MB)

  • GEF Focal Point Endorsements:
    Albania, English (PDF - 718 KB)
    Algeria, French (PDF - 313 KB)
    Bosnia & Herzegovina, English (PDF - 1 MB)
    Cape Verde, English (PDF - 495 KB)
    Croatia, English (PDF - 36 KB)
    Jordan, English (PDF - 37 KB)
    Lebanon, English (PDF - 105 KB)
    Libya, English (PDF - 1.2 MB)
    Macedonia English (PDF - 87 KB)
    Montenegro, English (PDF - 393 KB)
    Morocco, English (PDF - 43 KB)
    Tunisia, French (PDF - 948 KB)
  • ​Hotspot Factsheet
    English​ (PDF - 1.7 MB)

  • Long-Term Strategic Vision for in the Balkan, 2015
    English​ (PDF - 1.8 MB)

MONITORING & EVALUATION

  • Update on Impact on Biodiversity of the Mediterranean Portfolio, December 2016
    English​ (PDF - 634 KB)

  • Annual Portfolio Overview, 2016
    English​ (PDF - 1.2 MB)

  • Mid-Term Assessment, June 2012 – May 2015
    English (PDF - 1.5 MB)

  • Annual Portfolio Overview, 2013
    English​ (PDF - 1.1 MB)

  • Project Final Reports
    Reports compiled by project leaders detailing final results and lessons learned
    View reports

 

NEWSLETTERS from the regional implementation team


MEDITERRANEAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETINGS

  • November 2016 Minutes
    English (PDF - 210 KB)

  • February 2016 Minutes
    English (PDF - 416 KB)

  • September 2015 Minutes
    English (PDF - 452 KB)

  • May 2015 Minutes
    English (PDF - 389 KB)

  • January 2014 Minutes
    English​ (PDF - 1.4 MB)


OTHER PUBLICATIONS

"The Spice of Life," BirdLife World BirdWatch, September 2015
English (PDF -344 KB)

The Status and Distribution of Freshwater Biodiversity in the Eastern Mediterranean. International Union for Conservation of Nature, 2014
English (PDF - 10.1 MB)

Freshwater Key Biodiversity Areas in the Mediterranean Basin Hostpot, International Union for Conservation of Nature, 2014
English (PDF - 5.1 MB)

State-of-the-art and future scenarios report, BojAna tour, December 2014
English​ (PDF - 4.7 MB)

Hotspot Conservation, World Birdwatch, BirdLife International, March 2014
English (PDF - 294 KB)​

Naša Neretva, Siječanj - Lipanj 2013
Croatian (PDF - 1.91 MB)​​​​​​

Tab 6

Fast Facts

​Status: Active

Initial investment: 
  • $11.2 million
  • 2012-2017​
Regional Implementation Team (RIT):
BirdLife International
Cambridge, United Kingdom

Contact:


RIT Social:
Recent News
Publication "Together: Local Solutions for Nature Conservation"

The Mediterranean Basin S
toryMap
English / French
Originally published on BirdLife and LPO
English / French

MED RIT Radar

Articles from the RIT
Regional Resources
​​
NEW: Ecosystem Pr​ofile, 2017
- English (PDF - 31 MB)

NEW: Ecosystem Profile Technical Summary, 2017
- English (PDF - 4.6 MB)
- French​ (PDF - 5 MB)
Arabic (PDF - 2.7 MB)

Mediterranean Summary Brochure, 2010
- English (PDF - 3 MB)
- French (PDF - 3 MB)
- Arabic (PDF - 1.3 MB)​


Eligible Countries:
Albania
Algeria
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Cape Verde
Jordan
Lebanon
Libya
Macedonia
Montenegro
Morocco
Tunisia

​As a result of the civil conflict, CEPF is currently unable to issue grants in Syria.​​